African Securities Development’s Index Indentations

The UK-based OMFIF and South Africa’s Absa Bank released the second annual African Financial Markets Index measuring progress in a half-dozen categories in 20 countries, with improved scores in Kenya, Morocco and Nigeria alongside deterioration in Mauritius and Namibia. In an introduction African Development Bank President Adesina cited its own local bond initiative operating for a decade which catalyzed $250 billion in issuance last year, 80% in short-term maturity Treasury bills. The AfDB’s data base covers twice the number of index economies, and the chief executive noted that universal energy access alone will demand $50 billion in annual capital mobilization through 2025. On a scale of 100, South Africa was again the runaway leader at 93, followed by Botswana, Kenya, Mauritius and Nigeria in the 60s.  At the bottom from 25-35 were Ethiopia, Angola and Mozambique, while Namibia, Ghana, Zambia, Morocco and Uganda were in the middle in the 50s. The components were market depth, foreign exchange availability, tax/regulatory framework, domestic investor capacity, economic potential and international agreement entry. The survey praises dedicated financial sector deepening strategies in Mozambique and South Africa, but criticizes low local investor and currency liquidity averages. On accounting rules, 17 of the 20 mandate IFRS, with Cote d’Ivoire just added to the list. Equity and bond turnover are generally minimal at one-tenth of capitalization, and regional coordination is lacking according to the analysis, which combined desk work with fifty field interviews. In 15 countries size is less than 50% of GDP, and corporate bond activity is negligible where it exists, with the government segment six times bigger at $315 billion. Secondary trading, benchmark yield curves and new listings are rare, and domestic institutional investor allocation guidelines can be rigid. Small company tiers are under consideration, and real estate trusts and Islamic-style sukuk are in the product pipeline. Technology has moved to online dealing and electronic infrastructure, and West and Southern Africa have platforms for exchange integration.

Kenya relaxed exchange controls, while South Africa’s over $1 trillion hard currency volume dominates the continent. Reserves fell in Angola and Nigeria with oil price declines, and Egypt’s tripled the past five years with Gulf and IMF assistance. Half the currencies float freely, while the CFA Franc zones and rand area have pegs. Only half the index countries have corporate credit ratings from the three global agencies, and Uganda has high 20% withholding tax and Rwanda’s legal shareholder protections are not well translated in practice. South Africa has multiple regulators, and just one-third the index follow Basel III banking norms. Pension and insurance funds are undeveloped, with the ratio to domestic assets under 20% apart from Botswana, South Africa, Namibia and Seychelles. Strict product and geographic restrictions limit diversification, and manager knowledge and expertise is likewise narrow. Mauritius is an exception with widespread exposure to derivatives, but risk aversion prevails even in the index members with a sophisticated spectrum of contractual savings providers. Financial inclusion is also a capital markets challenge with scant outreach to small business, women and rural locations. With economic growth expected to stay below 5% and infrastructure needs alone estimated at $150 billion annually, the compelling case for market expansion is clear even if future plans are murky, the review concludes.

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